Welcome

The Sisters Project combats negative stereotypes of Muslim women by showcasing the diverse stories of inspirational women across Canada, while also creating a space of inclusion and belonging for all self-identifying Muslim women to embrace and celebrate their unique identities

Created by Alia Youssef

Ayeshah

Ayeshah

“I think the greatest challenge for me was finding who I truly am and where I belong. I’ve struggled with self-identity in the past being from Montreal and raised by Pakistani parents, and it wasn’t easy. I can definitely say that I finally know who I am; I am a human who belongs on Earth and whatever my identity I want to help the world be a safe and kind place.”

Ayeshah is 22, a bachelor of social work student, and a supervised access worker at Veith House, a neighborhood hub that meets the needs of children and families based in Halifax, NS. She told me that volunteering at the Veith House helped her discover what it really meant to give back, which in turn helped her decide the career she wants to pursue. What’s most important to Ayeshah is being kind because “without kindness life is not fulfilling.” She continued, “Being kind allows me to see the good in others and myself and to work towards a world that is forgiving. Like my mom always says kindness always wins no matter what.” When she is not giving back, Ayeshah likes to write short stories and novels. When I asked her how she thinks she’s perceived in her city she told me, “Many times I feel that I am perceived as an unnecessary person who is just taking up space and has nothing to offer.” She hopes that she’ll be perceived as an “as an intelligent Muslim woman that just wants the best for everyone” instead.

Q&A Feature:

What is your biggest hope?

“My biggest hope is to see a world where everyone loves each other regardless of their differences.”

What is a fun fact about you that you haven’t told me yet?

“I can beat box.”

Masuma

Masuma

Tahmina

Tahmina