Welcome

The Sisters Project combats negative stereotypes of Muslim women by showcasing the diverse stories of inspirational women across Canada, while also creating a space of inclusion and belonging for all self-identifying Muslim women to embrace and celebrate their unique identities

Created by Alia Youssef

Aisha

Aisha

“Black girls are told by society that we will not amount to much and everything I work towards proves to myself, the world, and other Black girls that we are majestic queens with limitless potential.”

Aisha is 20 and an Applied Computer Science and Political Science student at Dalhousie University (Halifax, NS.) She is a night manager at the Dalhousie Student Union and founder of the Dalhousie Black, Indigenous and People of Colour Caucus known as BIPOCUS. She is most proud of founding and building up BIPOCUS as it’s the first organization of its kind that promotes the coming together and uplifting of those communities as a collective. She told me, “We create supports to buildup BIPOC students, advocate on issues affecting BIPOC students, plan events that centre our voices and needs, and work to continually educate ourselves and our membership as well as seek out best practices on governance. It’s been a dream of mine for a while to create such a society at Dalhousie and to see it become a reality with so many different people finding friendships, building community and feeling validated and seen is just amazing.” Aisha’s own favourite quality is that she is able to truly live in the moment. She continued, “I don’t allow the baggage of life and other issues to get me down. I easily move on and nothing can get me down for too long.” When I asked Aisha how she would like to be perceived she told me, “I want to be perceived on my own terms. Yes, I am a Black Muslim Woman but that is not all I am. I’m smart, funny, accomplished, sometimes airheaded, and hardworking. I love going on adventures and am always down to make new friends and experience new things. I care about racial justice, uplifting BIPOC folks, and the environment. I also enjoy reading a good manga and am obsessed with J. Cole, Kehlani, and SZA. I want people to see the full me, not just my race or religion and the harmful stereotypes associated with both.”

Q&A Feature:

What is a fun fact about you that you haven’t told me yet?

"I have a black belt in Tae Kwon Do. I used to do the sport competitively and recreationally during junior high and a bit in high school as well. Once I reached university, I would run day camps for younger students during the summer and even practice recreationally."

What is your biggest hope?

"I have so many hopes – I’ve often been told I’m too optimistic, but I’ve learned that you got to believe and act in order to make change happen. I hope that BIPOCUS makes a real difference at Dalhousie, I hope to continue doing racial justice work wherever the future takes me, I hope to make my family and friends proud, I hope to always stay in tune with my communities and so much more."

Aya

Aya

Fatima

Fatima